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The Christian Fight

 

  Hebrews 11:5-6

(5) By faith Enoch was translated that he should not see death; and was not found, because God had translated him: for before his translation he had this testimony, that he pleased God. (6) But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.
King James Version

 

The world generally interprets the statements regarding Enoch being translated (as in the KJV and other translations) to mean that Enoch was taken to heaven. That is simply untrue, as it contradicts other scriptures. For instance, Hebrews 9:27 states, “And it is appointed for men to die once.” In context, this is showing Christ’s commonality with mankind: Even as it is appointed for men to die once because of sin, so the perfect Christ died once as a sacrifice in mankind’s behalf to pay for sin. If what the world says about Enoch’s translation is true, Enoch did not die, creating a contradiction in Scripture.

Jesus makes an authoritative declaration regarding what happens after death in John 3:13, “No one has ascended to heaven but He that came down from heaven,” meaning Himself. Who would know better than Jesus? “No one” certainly includes Enoch. Peter declares in Acts 2:29-34 that one as great as David has not risen to heaven either, but is still in the grave.

Hebrews 11:32 lists several other significant people of faith who served God with zeal. The section concludes, “And all these, having obtained a good testimony through faith, did not receive the promise, God having provided something better for us, that they should not be made perfect apart from us” (verses 39-40). These and many more unnamed saints are awaiting the resurrection of the dead and glorification in God’s Kingdom. This also applies to Enoch.

The term taken away (NKJV) or translated (KJV) in Hebrews 11:5 simply means “transferred.” Enoch was transferred or conveyed from one place on earth to another to escape violence aimed against him. In this other earthly place, he died like all men.

We experience a spiritual form of this, as Colossians 1:13 shows: “He has delivered us from the power of darkness, and conveyed (translated, KJV) us into the kingdom of the Son of His love.” Because we are justified and therefore reconciled to God through faith in the blood of Jesus Christ, our true spiritual citizenship is now transferred to the Kingdom of God. The implication of this is that with this transfer comes the obligation to live and walk representing the Kingdom of God’s way of life. Enoch’s walk by faith tells us that he set aside his own carnal preferences and will, bowing in obedience before God’s will and submitting his life to God’s desires for him. Enoch did so by faith, which is why he pleased God.

Jude 14-16 adds a factor that needs consideration:

Now Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied about these men also, saying, “Behold, the Lord comes with ten thousands of His saints, to execute judgment on all, to convict all who are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds which they have committed in an ungodly way, and of all the harsh things which ungodly sinners have spoken against Him.” These are murmurers, complainers, walking according to their own lusts; and they mouth great swelling words, flattering people to gain advantage.

Abel was a keeper of sheep and suffered a violent death. Enoch, however, was a preacher and undoubtedly walked to the beat of a different drummer than those around him. As a preacher, he probably gave messages that made others feel ill at ease with him, and it appears that this put him in danger of a violent death, precipitating his miraculous transfer to a safer place.

— John W. Ritenbaugh

To learn more, see:
The Christian Fight (Part Four)

 

Related Topics:
Citizenship in Heaven
Elijah
Enoch
Enoch’s Translation
Enoch’s Walk with God
Heaven
Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man
Resurrection
Submission to God
Submission to God’s Will
Walk
Walk as Codeword for Living
Walk in the Law of the Lord
Walk in the Light
Walk the Walk
Walk with God
Walking as a Metaphor for Agreement
Walking by Faith
Walking by Sight
Walking Metaphor
Walking with Christ
Walking Worthily
Walking Worthy of Our Vocation